Skip to main content

About your Search

English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
of civil rights in america. we'll tell you about that next. ♪ i've got you under my skin if you're seeing spots before your eyes... it's time... for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a month. then go ahead and try to spot a spot. aveeno® positively radiant. naturally beautiful results. [ male announcer ] campbell's homestyle soup with farm grown veggies. just like yours. huh. [ male announcer ] and roasted white meat chicken. just like yours. [ male announcer ] you'll think it's homemade. i love this show. [ male announcer ] try campbell's homestyle soup. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3 creepy gnomes ♪ 2 angry geese ♪ and a giant blow-up snowman ♪ that kind of freaks me out [ beep ] [ fem
rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work form your own? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. and when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i noknow all about you. i follow you. you inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they h
, because the first weekend in july 50 years ago was when the civil rights act of 1964 was signed. >> wow. >> and so we will be back the first week in july 50 years later, and we will recommit ourselves to that purpose of that civil rights opportunity act. so we're excited. >> now, we got it's the 20th anniversary. it's going to be around voting 50 years after the civil rights act. but one thing that is always off the chain is the entertainment. but i said that there's no way you could beat last year because you had beyonce. but you did. we're announcing tonight you have prince next year. >> prince will headline our essence festival for 2014. he was our headliner ten years ago for the tenth anniversary, and he is back. we are honored, excited, and even more emboldened than ever that this will be the biggest party and will position us to achieve our purpose in 2014. >> as you look back as someone that wasn't around when essence was founded and you see where we are today in the midst of this is the middle of the second term of the first african-american president, you're hosting such a huge
for freedom. the music moved and motivated an embattled people. our civil rights movement had its music, but, in south africa, hundreds of songs rang out. >> ( singing "nanku" ) >> marsalis: "nanku," recorded by mariam makeba, kept alive the spirit of mandela and others locked up on robben island. >> the nation's feelings when those guys were all in jail was how much they missed them. ( sings "nangue" ) and it says they are all rotting in jail. while we need them here, they are all rotting in jail. >> ♪ nan gue nanque nangue, mandela oh, my africa. ♪ >> you know, nobody had seen him since the 1960s. by the '80s, you were not allowed to say his name in south africa. ♪ >> marsalis: in the mid 1980s, hugh was far from home, making music in botswana when nelson mandela reached out to him. in 1985, he was still incarcerated. he took the time to write you a letter on your birthday. >> he just had this letter smuggled out of prison. here's a guy who's been in jail for 20 years, but he's writing to me, giving me encouragement. i just stood there and said, "wow," and i then went to the piano an
in america, so much of the american civil rights movement was reminding african-americans and still is, reminding young children of color, you are equal, you do deserve the exact same things. i think that made a huge difference. >> i think part of that was if you understand he was born in royalty. he was born to a certain manner. his self-concept, he that naturally and he never lost it. because he didn't have that insecurity, he didn't need all that to become a leader. his vanity never outran his sanity. >> talking about the legacy of nelson mandela, we're talking about how those qualities of grace, dignity, humility have been inherited or visited on later generations. i want to play an excerpt from your interview with the president last night where he himself takes a remarkably humble posture as far as being commander in chief, president of the united states. lets take a listen to that. >> the interesting thing about now having been president for five years. it makes you humbler as opposed to cockier as to what you as an individual can do. you recognize you're just part of the sweep o
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
for prominent african-americans or commemorations of civil right events of which the clintons have been present. marking the hundredth a anniversary of the largest african-american sorority. >> the idea that in the 21st century african-americans would wait in line to vote for ten hours while whites in an affluent precinct next door waited just ten minutes, or that african-americans would receive fliers telling them the wrong time and day to exercise their constitutional rights, that is not the america we expect or the america we want for our children. >> well, in the article in the "new york times" i mentioned, former virginia governor the first elected african-american governor in the country recalled a conversation with bill clinton in may this way. i'd be less than honest, the governor said, if i didn't tell you i came away convinced that there was no question about her running. joy reid is msnbc contributor and eugene robinson columnist at "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst. you're smiling, joy. i think it's for me, but maybe it's about the topic. my question is first of all
at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas. we talk a lot in vague terms how iconic and important he was. can you somehow crystallize it from a global perspective, his impact? >> just imagine if nelson mandela had been a different kind of person and south africa had gone into a bloody race war in which apartheid didn't end peacefully, but instead, had been a violent transition in which hundreds of thousands of people had died simply because of race. imagine what that
. >> reporter: civil rights lawyer george bizos was mandela's attorney and friend. >> he was an example to the people of south africa, to the people of africa, to the people of the world as to how authorities is to be exercised. >> reporter: almost 60 heads of state including president barack obama and most of the living former u.s. presidents will attend mandela's memorial and funeral services this week. from a massive ceremony at a johannesburg stadium tuesday to lying in state in the capitol pretoria to burial next sunday in his ancestral village in the eastern cape province, it's expected to be one of the largest global gatherings in recent history. >>> you say 11,000 -- >> 11,000 troops have been deployed. >> reporter: defense minister nosiviwe mapisa-nqakula is overseeing security. she says soldier, the air force, national and city police all are being deployed to control and protect tens of thousands of mourners. >> this is a test for us. and we know that and believe that people will be watching how south africa perform. >> today a south african's pray, they also worry, the show
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
are protesting against a lack of immigration policy. you have the civil rights agenda that's coming into fruition. you've got the supreme court now taking up an aspect of obama care, but also that touches on first amendment rights. so a whole lot of pieces of this puzzle that are going to -- i think can be problematic for both parties. but certainly for the republican party if they don't understand how to message themselves and put in place, i think, substantive policies that begin to address some of these issues. >> and you know, john, it's interesting. you get the sense that republicans do sort of see that. eric cantor this week talking about the fact that the gop needs to be able to answer a basic question, how do we address the fundamental problems that people have. with all of that menu of issues you heard michael steele mention, do republicans now run the risk of hubris, thinking obama care means we can go whole hog. we don't have to worry about really appearing uncompassionate when a lot of americans are changing their minds about things like minimum wage or food stamps or i might be one o
that are starting to say, you know what, we're going to have to treat this almost like the civil rights movement. we're going to have to break this down into pieces and just keep moving the ball forward, but we cannot keep the status quo that we have right now. that doesn't work for anybody. >> the political equation is so interesting, i think, in this case because as you pointed out, margie, when you look at the polls and the demographics of the voting public, it just makes sense. now we're seeing chris christie, who of course is being named as a possible nominee in 2016, being accused of flip-flopping on in-state tuition for young, undocumented immigrants because his critics say he wants to run for president. he says he continues to support the idea, although he won't sign the specific bill that was passed by his state legislature. here's what he said yesterday about that flip-flopping charge. >> i am for tuition equality. as i said that night at the latino leadership, i am for tuition quality. i am not for adding tuition aid grants or adding undocumented out of state students to have rights that
to create the santa clausification of rosa parks and martin luther king jr. and other civil rights leaders. they are cast as figures with no history or context, just celebrated as the good guys who fought the forces of evil. consider the 2005 eulogy for parks from bill frist, flagged today. frisk said it was "not an intentional attempt to change a nation but a singular act aimed at restoring the dignity of the individual." and that gets it exactly wrong. rosa parks was an actual human being who was embedded in a whole bunch of institutions and organizations that were very much trying to change the nation. she was part of not just the liberal left, but the radical left. she trained at the highlander folk school in tennessitennesse legendary leftist training guard regarded as a communist training school by southern segregationist. she was secretary of the montgomery naacp when arrested, an organization with deep roots in the city's trade union movement, which it helped organize her protest. she years earlier helped organize a campaign for young african-americans to borrow books from whites-o
paying tribute to rosa parks. and the role she played in the civil rights movement in this country. but as you can imagine, many americans were surprised to hear racism was all over. the tweet sent off a firestorm online. maybe the backlash has something to do with the fact that this is still happening in america. >> set up near a mitt romney for president sign was a chair empty, except for two water melons, a rope tied into an apparent noose with a sign set up to look like a teleprompter that read, "go back to kenya." >> the sign in front of the georgia peach oyster bar says they don't support barack obama and the white house but uses the "n" word. >> the neighbor put a sign in his yard that uses the "n" word and claims it was directed at them. >> in an e-mail sent to an unknown number of officials, marlin davenport sent this photo, along with the phrase, now you know why no birth certificate. >> the rnc clarified its tweet saying previous tweet should have said today we remember rosa parks' bold stand and her role in fighting to end racism. joining me now in our rapid response pa
in the southerners that fled after the passage of the civil rights act and precipitated the migration of the center of gravity in the republican party to the south. and you see this, you know, not just in the evolution of the elected officials in the party but also in polling of the attitudes of republicans, you know, republican voters. it's not an accident that the republican party said rosa parks has ended racism. because in polls you constantly see the majorities of republican voters and conservative voters believe that the real discrimination in this country is against white people and that kind of all structural racism had been eradicated. this wasn't a slip of the tongue as much as it was the accidentally revealing a basic tenant of conservative thought. >> i politely disagree with michelle. i don't know what poll that is. i would love to get the site of the polls that are saying that a vast majority of republicans view that there's reverse discrimination. and there's more white persons being discriminated against in this country and that's the real racism. certainly that was not the party th
. although he did relax a little bit when i told him about my experience in the civil rights movement, but it brought to mind for him maya angelou, do you know her? talked about how he had -- they had read her work in prison. but then, as i watched him over the years as he spent more and more time in the outside world, he became a little more relaxed and talked more and more about what it was like in prison. and talk more and more about his own vision. he was always a very humble man. he never really -- although he was the leader, he never took credit. for example, when i asked him at a day back in his yard a few days after prison, when everybody thought he was going to be president, do you foresee a time when you will become president of this country? he said, well, you know, that's up to my -- i'm a loyal member of the african national congress and whatever they decide. behind the scene i understand he could rule with a kind of iron hand when necessary. but the face -- his face to the public was always of a genial giant. >> way he comported himself and humility is very genuine descr
a pivotal moment in civil rights history that happened on this day 60 years ago. the landmark brown versus the board of education decision of 1954 declared that separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. an important part of that decision was the one that applied to washington, d.c. and six decades ago today two lawyers argued the washington, d.c. portion of the case. their argument, school segregation was a violation of liberty. the decision would have a direct impact on the first high school in the country, dunbar high school in washington, d.c. opened in 1870 and despite being segregated, it developed ground breaker after ground breaker. including george hayes. one of the lawyers who argued the case. and charles hamilton houston, the lawyer known as the man who killed jim crow. this year a great book chronicles the school in "first class: the legacy of dunbar, america's first black public high school." joining me now is the author allison stewart. allison, thanks for being here. >> i am thrilled to be here. >> let's start 60 years ago today. they argued
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
as a spoil of war, you helped return the art to its rightful owners. >> unique in the history of civilization. >> reporter: no country had ever done that before. >> they supervised the return of 5 million, 5 million stolen objects to the countries from which these things were taken. >> reporter: paintings were returned to museums. >> there it is. >> reporter: works you can see today. >> parc monceau. this claude monet painting is one at the new york metropolitan museum of art along with this van goyen landscape and soap bubbles. hitler wants this one. >> he wants the best of the best of the things he decides are the best. >> reporter: the nazis not only stole from museums but also from thousands of families. to recover the possessions including the artwork of families just like yours must have really connected with you? >> absolutely. i ended up being able to come along and recover my grandfather's collection of 3,000 prints, some of them are hanging in my apartment right now. >> reporter: this was rye of works stolen by the nazis have still never been f like rafael's portrait of a young man.
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)